Magnablend (and in general Drill Site or Injection Well Site) Runoff Water Testing Coverage Questionable

WFAA Coverage  update…here is the letter to try to remedy the gap

 

From: Kim Feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
Date: January 29, 2012 7:36:58 PM CST
To: ramon.fernandez@rrc.state.tx.us
Cc: michael.o’quinn@rrc.state.tx.us
Bcc: TXsharon Wilson <sharson@gmail.com>, Robert Rivera <robert.rivera@arlingtontx.gov>, “Dr. Robert Cluck” <robert.cluck@arlingtontx.gov>, Robert Shepard <robert.shepard@arlingtontx.gov>, Jim Parajon <jim.parajon@arlingtontx.gov>, Jimmy Bennett <jimmy.bennett@arlingtontx.gov>, Mel LeBlanc <Mel.LeBlanc@arlingtontx.gov>, Sheri Capeharts <sheri.capehart@arlingtontx.gov>, “Kathryn.Wilemon@arlingtontx.gov” <kathryn.wilemon@arlingtontx.gov>, Lana Wolff <lana.wolff@arlingtontx.gov>, Kim Feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: Mike O’Quinn referred me to you re protocol in flooded O & G sites

 

Regarding when oil and gas drill sites are flooded by a rain storm and where the RRC investigators initially respond and take a chlorides test for signs of a produced water spill, I am compelled to write to you to ask you to review that process which logically is inadequate to detect fracking chemicals, toxins in drilling mud, NORM or heavy metals.

Lab testing is appropriate so as to not put the public or the environment at risk should there be toxins that do not show up in a chloride test.
Checking for a sheen or for an odor is also not conclusive that all is safe to release into the environment.
If the site is flooded, and a valve leaked, any investigator looking for discolored dirt or discolored water will have a compromised area that is now covered up and diluted.
Each phase of the life cycle of an oil and gas site needs to have a flood plan water test for each phase that the site was in when the flood occurred.
If it is cost prohibitive to lab test and recover those costs through an enforcement action should they driller be found out of compliance, a safe protocol would be to order ALL flooded sites to be vacuumed up and sent to an appropriate injection disposal site.
Please let me know what step you can take to bring this idea to fruition to the RRC.
Also, anytime I see front loader or bulldozer pushing dirt around a site, I worry they are covering something up.  How can we know they are doing grading and not doctoring?

———————————————————————————————–

Every time I see a guy on a bulldozer/loader spreading dirt around that I worry  a spill is being covered up and later washing into urban areas and into our storm drains.  I was told by TCEQ Tammy Glasscock (PIR dept) 817 588-5835 that the person she knew of that came out to test did NOT do a water test. In speaking with Jaimie at Magnablend, she said they did call TCEQ and that TCEQ DID take a sample. But I just learned from a source that TCEQ directed Magnablend to have their contractor take tests. Jaimie is finding out if Magnablend is planning on making public the tests results from their third party independent water test. Only raw numbers are what I want!

I was told by TCEQ Tammy Glasscock (PIR dept) 817 588-5835 that the person she knew of that came out to test did NOT do a water test. In speaking with Jaimie at Magnablend, she said they did call TCEQ and that TCEQ DID take a sample. But I just learned from a source  TCEQ directed Magnablend to have their contractor take tests. Jaimie is finding out if Magnablend is planning on making public their tests results from their third party independent water test.

I also called the EPA Dallas office. Mr Everett Spencer was not even aware of the run off event and mentioned that the foam may be the constituents of the fire department’s chemicals used to put out the fire and wasn’t even sure if they would go out and test! I was very specific that a test for fracking chemicals was in order because the odors were said to have matched the odor during the burning of the plant. I told Mr Spencer that I am expecting a call back verifying if the EPA would be out and taking a water test for fracking chemicals. Mr Spencer took my phone number down and said he would let me know.

I also called the RRC and spoke to Mike O’Quinn who said the jurisdiction does not kick in for them until the fracking chemicals are at the padsite. While I had him on the phone, I asked him what the standard operating procedure was for a rain flooded drill site. He said the field inspectors have chloride tests on them and that checking for salt water is all that they do unless they see evidence of a spill. If so, then they take more samples and send them to the lab.

I asked what is the evidence they look for in a spill. He said if a valve leaked, there would be marks on the ground or discolored water.  I told him depending on how much rain we have, then the marks on the ground and the discoloration (or odor) would become diluted.  I told him I was uncomfortable with ANY flood waters on a padsite EVER being released. Passing a chloride/odor/sheen test after any frack job is not enough. We need lab testing geared for fracking chemicals,  heavy metals, NORM and other drilling related effluents.

Advertisements

About Kim Triolo Feil

Since TX Statute 253.005 forbids drilling in heavily settled municipalities, I unsuccessfully ran for City Council Seat to try to enforce this. Since Urban Drilling, our drinking water has almost tripled for TTHM's. Before moving to Arlington in 1990, I lived in Norco’s “cancer alley”, a refinery town. It was only after Urban Drilling in Arlington did I start having health effects. After our drill site was established closest to my home, the chronic nosebleeds started. I know there are more canaries here in Arlington having reactions to our industrialized airshed (we have 55-60 padsites of gas wells). Come forward and report to me those having health issues especially if you live to the north/northwest of a drill site so I can map your health effects on this blog. My youtube account is KimFeilGood. FAIR USE NOTICE: THIS SITE MAY CONTAIN COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL THE USE OF WHICH HAS NOT ALWAYS BEEN SPECIFICALLY AUTHORIZED BY THE COPYRIGHT OWNER. MATERIAL FROM DIVERSE AND SOMETIMES TEMPORARY SOURCES IS BEING MADE AVAILABLE IN A PERMANENT UNIFIED MANNER, AS PART OF AN EFFORT TO ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH EMINENT DOMAIN AND THE PRIVATIZATION OF PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE (AMONG OTHER THINGS). IT IS BELIEVED THAT THIS IS A 'FAIR USE' OF THE INFORMATION AS ALLOWED UNDER SECTION 107 OF THE US COPYRIGHT LAW. IN ACCORDANCE WITH TITLE 17 USC SECTION 107, THE SITE IS MAINTAINED WITHOUT PROFIT FOR THOSE WHO ACCESS IT FOR RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE: HTTP://WWW.LAW.CORNELL.EDU/ TO USE MATERIAL REPRODUCED ON THIS SITE FOR PURPOSES THAT GO BEYOND 'FAIR USE', PERMISSION IS REQUIRED FROM THE COPYRIGHT OWNER INDICATED WITH A NAME AND INTERNET LINK AT THE END OF EACH ITEM. (NOTE: THE TEXT OF THIS NOTICE WAS ALSO LIFTED FROM CORRIDORNEWS.BLOGSPOT.COM)
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Magnablend (and in general Drill Site or Injection Well Site) Runoff Water Testing Coverage Questionable

  1. Pingback: Fracking Fear Mongering Council Candidate at Her Best….. | City Council Candidate, Kim Feil Forum

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s