TCEQ (reported) Emission Events summary 2007-2014

2007

Emissions Events: The overall number of incidents reported decreased by 12% which may be
attributable to rule changes that became effective on January 5, 2006. The rule changes allow
regulated entities to submit one report per emissions event associated by a common cause.
The reported quantity of emissions increased by 35%, which is attributable to the
aforementioned rule changes that require regulated entities to report all the unauthorized
emissions that are associated to a common cause, including emissions previously not required
to be reported. Natural gas comprises the greatest percentage of all contaminants reported,
with a reported increase over Fiscal Year 2006. The crude petroleum and natural gas industry
reported the highest number of incidents. The industrial organic chemicals industry showed the
greatest decrease in reported incidents, with 46% fewer reported incidents. There was an
overall decrease in reported Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds from 4,711,308
pounds in Fiscal Year 2006 to 1,669,716 pounds in Fiscal Year 2007.

2008

Emissions Events: The overall number of incidents reported increased slightly by 9%. The
reported quantity of emissions decreased significantly by 56%, which is partially attributable to a
single emission event (natural gas pipeline rupture and fire) that was reported in Fiscal Year
2007 that resulted in a release of 22 million pounds of natural gas. Sulfur dioxide, at 46%,
comprises the greatest percentage of all contaminants reported. However, there was a
decrease of 7% in the amount of sulfur dioxide emissions from Fiscal Year 2007. The carbon
and graphite products industry reported the highest number of incidents, increasing by 66%
from Fiscal Year 2007. The petroleum refining industry showed the greatest decrease in
reported incidents, with 22% fewer reported incidents in Fiscal Year 2008. Petroleum refining
also showed a reduction in reported incidents of 27% in Fiscal Year 2007. There was an overall
increase in reported Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds from 1,669,716 pounds in
Fiscal Year 2007 to 2,193,517 pounds in Fiscal Year 2008.

2009

Emissions Events: The overall number of incidents reported decreased by 7%. The reported
quantity of emissions increased by 69%. The increase in the Midland region was attributed to
incidents associated with large releases from a few sites. The increases in the Houston and
Beaumont regions were primarily a result of Hurricane Ike. The overall quantity of reported air
contaminants increased by 69%. Midland and Beaumont regions had the most influence for this
increase, followed by Houston, Lubbock, and Laredo regions. Sulfur dioxide comprised the
greatest percentage, 42%, of all the contaminants reported. The total number of incidents
reported during FY 2009 was led by the crude petroleum and natural gas industry, which had a
27% increase from FY2008. The carbon and graphite products industry showed the greatest
percentage reduction in reported incidents, at 42% fewer reported incidents. There was an
overall increase in the amount of Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds reported from
2,193,517 in FY 2008 to 2,798,540 in FY 2009.

2010

Emissions Events: The overall number of incidents reported decreased 12%. The overall
number of investigations conducted decreased from 2,011 in FY 2009 to 1,918 in FY 2010. The
following Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Code sectors reported the most incidents: 1311
(Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas), 4911 (Electric Services), 2911 (Petroleum Refining), 2869
(Industrial Organic Chemicals), 1321 (Natural Gas Liquids). The reported quantity of emissions
from FY 2009 to FY 2010 decreased from 68,593,695 pounds to 55,079,953, which is a 20%
decrease. The Midland region saw the largest decrease in emissions, followed by the Houston
region. Increases were experienced in the regions of Beaumont, Lubbock, and Corpus Christi.
The large decrease in the Midland region was attributed to fewer large release incidents. Sulfur
dioxide comprised the greatest quantity, 19.6 million pounds, of all the contaminants reported.
There was an overall decrease in the amount of HRVOCs reported from 2,798,540 in FY 2009 to
1,843,506 in FY 2010.

2011

Emissions Events: The overall number of incidents reported decreased 6% from 4,766 in FY
2010 to 4,469 in FY 2011. The overall number of investigations conducted decreased from 1,918
in FY 2010 to 1,622 in FY 2011. The following Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Code
sectors reported the most incidents: 1311 (Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas), 1321 (Natural Gas
Liquids), 4922 (Natural Gas Transmission), 2911 (Petroleum Refining), and 2869 (Industrial
Organic Chemicals). The reported quantity of emissions from FY 2010 to FY 2011 increased
from 55,079,953 pounds to 69,052,877, which is a 25% increase. The Midland region saw the
largest increase in emissions, followed by the Lubbock region. The large increase in the Midland
region was attributed to oil and gas production growth that outpaced expectations and exceeded
the infrastructure capacity of the Permian Basin. Decreases were experienced in the regions of
Beaumont and Houston. Sulfur dioxide comprised the greatest quantity, 24 million pounds, of
all the contaminants reported. There was an overall decrease in the amount of HRVOCs
reported from 1,843,506 in FY 2010 to 1,258,011 in FY 2011.

2012

Emissions Events: The overall number of incidents reported decreased 6% from 4,469 in FY
2011 to 4,290 in FY 2012. The overall number of investigations conducted decreased from 1,622
in FY 2011 to 1,415 in FY 2012. The following Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Code
sectors reported the most incidents: 4922 (Natural Gas Transmission), 1321 (Natural Gas
Liquids), 1311 (Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas), 2911 (Petroleum Refining), and 2869
(Industrial Organic Chemicals). The reported quantity of emissions from FY 2011 to FY 2012
increased 23% from 69,052,877 pounds to 84,603,345. Significant decreases were experienced
in the Lubbock, Corpus Christi and Abilene regions. The Midland region saw the largest increase
in emissions. The large increase in the Midland region was attributed to oil and gas production
growth that outpaced expectations and exceeded the infrastructure capacity of the Permian
Basin. Sulfur dioxide comprised the greatest quantity, 40.5 million pounds, of all the v
contaminants reported. There was an overall increase in the amount of highly-reactive volatile
organic compounds (HRVOCs) reported from 1,258,011 in FY 2011 to 2,806,402 in FY 2012.

2013

Emissions Events: The overall number of incidents reported increased 6% from 4,290 in FY
2012 to 4,533 in FY 2013. The overall number of investigations conducted decreased from 1,414
in FY 2012 to 1,392 in FY 2013. The following North American Industrial Classification System
(NAICS) code sectors reported the most incidents: 211111 (Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas
Extraction), 211112 (Natural Gas Liquid Extraction), and 32411 & 324110 (Petroleum
Refineries). The reported quantity of emissions from FY 2012 to FY 2013 decreased 22% from
84,603,345 pounds to 69,572,393. Significant decreases were experienced in the Midland, San II
Angelo, Tyler, Harlingen, and Austin regions. Some decreases in west Texas can be attributed to
improved oil and gas infrastructure. The Houston, Amarillo, San Antonio, and Dallas/Fort
Worth regions experienced an increase in emissions. The increases in these regions were
attributed to oil and gas production growth and large events in the Houston and Amarillo areas.
Sulfur dioxide comprised the greatest quantity, 33.6 million pounds, of all the contaminants
reported. There was an overall increase in the amount of highly-reactive volatile organic
compounds (HRVOCs) reported from 2,806,402 in FY 2012 to 3,019,193 in FY 2013.
Aggregate Production Operations: The TCEQ completed a total of 1,169 APO surveys and
95 investigations resulting in issuance of 66 Notices of Violation and identification of 569 sites
requiring additional investigation. Three Notices of Enforcement were issued; however, the final
enforcement orders have not yet become effective.

2014

Emissions Events: The overall number of incidents reported increased 10% from 4,533 in FY
2013 to 4,987 in FY 2014. The overall number of investigations increased slightly from 1,392 in
FY 2013 to 1,399 in FY 2014. The following North American Industrial Classification System
(NAICS) code sectors reported the highest number of incidents: 211111 (Crude Petroleum and
Natural Gas Extraction), 211112 (Natural Gas Liquid Extraction), and 324110 and 32411
(Petroleum Refineries). The reported quantity of emissions increased 14% from 69,572,393
pounds in FY 2013 to 79,147,373 pounds in FY 2014. The largest increases were experienced in II
the Laredo, Abilene, Lubbock, San Angelo, and Beaumont regions. Increases in the Beaumont
Region were due to large events, particularly at a methanol plant. Increases in the other regions
were due to processing of natural gas at gas plants. The Houston, Amarillo, San Antonio, and
Dallas/Fort Worth regions experienced a decrease in emissions, which was primarily due to
large events that had occurred in those regions during FY 2013. In addition, emissions from oil
and gas facilities in San Antonio generally decreased in FY 2014. Sulfur dioxide comprised the
greatest quantity, 34.8 million pounds, of all the contaminants reported. There was an overall
decrease in the amount of highly-reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOCs) reported from
3,019,193 pounds in FY 2013 to 1,974,877 pounds in FY 2014.
Aggregate Production Operations: In FY 2014, the TCEQ completed a total of 3,060 APO
surveys and 47 investigations, resulting in the issuance of 153 NOVs and 34 notices of
enforcement (NOEs). In addition, three enforcement orders were issued, requiring payments of
$2,401 in penalties.

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About Kim Triolo Feil

Since TX Statute 253.005 forbids drilling in heavily settled municipalities, I unsuccessfully ran for City Council Seat to try to enforce this. Since Urban Drilling, our drinking water has almost tripled for TTHM's. Before moving to Arlington in 1990, I lived in Norco’s “cancer alley”, a refinery town. It was only after Urban Drilling in Arlington did I start having health effects. After our drill site was established closest to my home, the chronic nosebleeds started. I know there are more canaries here in Arlington having reactions to our industrialized airshed (we have 55-60 padsites of gas wells). Come forward and report to me those having health issues especially if you live to the north/northwest of a drill site so I can map your health effects on this blog. My youtube account is KimFeilGood. FAIR USE NOTICE: THIS SITE MAY CONTAIN COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL THE USE OF WHICH HAS NOT ALWAYS BEEN SPECIFICALLY AUTHORIZED BY THE COPYRIGHT OWNER. MATERIAL FROM DIVERSE AND SOMETIMES TEMPORARY SOURCES IS BEING MADE AVAILABLE IN A PERMANENT UNIFIED MANNER, AS PART OF AN EFFORT TO ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH EMINENT DOMAIN AND THE PRIVATIZATION OF PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE (AMONG OTHER THINGS). IT IS BELIEVED THAT THIS IS A 'FAIR USE' OF THE INFORMATION AS ALLOWED UNDER SECTION 107 OF THE US COPYRIGHT LAW. IN ACCORDANCE WITH TITLE 17 USC SECTION 107, THE SITE IS MAINTAINED WITHOUT PROFIT FOR THOSE WHO ACCESS IT FOR RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE: HTTP://WWW.LAW.CORNELL.EDU/ TO USE MATERIAL REPRODUCED ON THIS SITE FOR PURPOSES THAT GO BEYOND 'FAIR USE', PERMISSION IS REQUIRED FROM THE COPYRIGHT OWNER INDICATED WITH A NAME AND INTERNET LINK AT THE END OF EACH ITEM. (NOTE: THE TEXT OF THIS NOTICE WAS ALSO LIFTED FROM CORRIDORNEWS.BLOGSPOT.COM)
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