Orphan Wells… is Arlington at Risk?

“…the Groundwater Protection Council, a nonprofit made up of state water agencies, found orphaned wells caused about one in five incidences of recorded oil and gas groundwater contamination in Ohio and Texas.
Plugging a well—removing equipment and filling holes with cement—costs $25,000 to $100,000 for conventional sites, by some state regulators’ estimates. Horizontal wells, typical in fracking, will likely cost more to plug, they say.”
—– Forwarded Message —–
From: kim feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
To: “jeff.williams@arlingtontx.gov” <jeff.williams@arlingtontx.gov>; Lana Wolff <lana.wolff@arlingtontx.gov>; Charlie Parker <charlie.parker@arlingtontx.gov>; Michael Glaspie <michael.glaspie@arlingtontx.gov>; Robert Rivera <robert.rivera@arlingtontx.gov>; Robert Shepard <robert.shepard@arlingtontx.gov>; Jimmy Bennett <jimmy.bennett@arlingtontx.gov>; Sheri Capehart <sheri.capehart@arlingtontx.gov>; Kathryn Wilemon <kathryn.wilemon@arlingtontx.gov>; Trey Yelverton <trey.yelverton@arlingtontx.gov>; Cynthia Simmons <cynthia.simmons@arlingtontx.gov>; Don Crowson <don.crowson@arlingtontx.gov>; Jim Parajon <jim.parajon@arlingtontx.gov>; Collin Gregory <collin.gregory@arlingtontx.gov>; “jessica.minley@arlingtontx.gov” <jessica.minley@arlingtontx.gov>; Tony Rutigliano <tony@downtownarlington.org>; Roger Venables <roger.venables@arlingtontx.gov>; Stuart Young <stuart.young@arlingtontx.gov>
Cc: Brett Shipp <bshipp@wfaa.com>
Sent: Thursday, August 6, 2015 11:15 PM
Subject: Orphan wells and their costs
“Drilling booms historically leave legions of idle wells that become state or federal wards. Yet agencies in some states, and federal regulators, aren’t adequately equipped to clean up so-called orphaned sites at a time when shale drilling is raising the prospects of still more….
Who pays to plug a well?
Abandoned wells can deteriorate underground over time, a process that can go unnoticed without inspection. A 2011 study by the Groundwater Protection Council, a nonprofit made up of state water agencies, found orphaned wells caused about one in five incidences of recorded oil and gas groundwater contamination in Ohio and Texas.
Plugging a well—removing equipment and filling holes with cement—costs $25,000 to $100,000 for conventional sites, by some state regulators’ estimates. Horizontal wells, typical in fracking, will likely cost more to plug, they say.
To avoid having to pay steep costs, most states and the federal government have policies to lay aside funds to clean up orphans, primarily by requiring companies to post bond before prospecting. But bonding often sets aside too little, leaving some agencies struggling to clean up tens of thousands of wells.
There is little nationwide data on orphaned wells or on which states face the greatest funding shortfalls for plugging. Lucas Davis, an associate economics professor at University of California, Berkeley, says current bonding levels are “unreasonably low” and should be raised in anticipation of abandoned wells from fracking.”
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About Kim Triolo Feil

Since TX Statute 253.005 forbids drilling in heavily settled municipalities, I unsuccessfully ran for City Council Seat to try to enforce this. Since Urban Drilling, our drinking water has almost tripled for TTHM's. Before moving to Arlington in 1990, I lived in Norco’s “cancer alley”, a refinery town. It was only after Urban Drilling in Arlington did I start having health effects. After our drill site was established closest to my home, the chronic nosebleeds started. I know there are more canaries here in Arlington having reactions to our industrialized airshed (we have 55-60 padsites of gas wells). Come forward and report to me those having health issues especially if you live to the north/northwest of a drill site so I can map your health effects on this blog. My youtube account is KimFeilGood. FAIR USE NOTICE: THIS SITE MAY CONTAIN COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL THE USE OF WHICH HAS NOT ALWAYS BEEN SPECIFICALLY AUTHORIZED BY THE COPYRIGHT OWNER. MATERIAL FROM DIVERSE AND SOMETIMES TEMPORARY SOURCES IS BEING MADE AVAILABLE IN A PERMANENT UNIFIED MANNER, AS PART OF AN EFFORT TO ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH EMINENT DOMAIN AND THE PRIVATIZATION OF PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE (AMONG OTHER THINGS). IT IS BELIEVED THAT THIS IS A 'FAIR USE' OF THE INFORMATION AS ALLOWED UNDER SECTION 107 OF THE US COPYRIGHT LAW. IN ACCORDANCE WITH TITLE 17 USC SECTION 107, THE SITE IS MAINTAINED WITHOUT PROFIT FOR THOSE WHO ACCESS IT FOR RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE: HTTP://WWW.LAW.CORNELL.EDU/ TO USE MATERIAL REPRODUCED ON THIS SITE FOR PURPOSES THAT GO BEYOND 'FAIR USE', PERMISSION IS REQUIRED FROM THE COPYRIGHT OWNER INDICATED WITH A NAME AND INTERNET LINK AT THE END OF EACH ITEM. (NOTE: THE TEXT OF THIS NOTICE WAS ALSO LIFTED FROM CORRIDORNEWS.BLOGSPOT.COM)
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