Arlington sendn $50m drilling money NOT to Safer Drinking Water Protection Plan

develop

link to story

Arlington City Council to Consider Mixed-Use Development Near Globe Life Park Using Gas Drilling Funds is one of two projects per The Arlington Voice.

I have a problem with risking/loaning half the drilling revenue funds ($50 million). “MY” Arlington Water Protection PLan is stating that drilling monies be used to buy back those drill site on the Ft Worth side of Lake Arlington that threaten our drinking water supplies.

I took pictures on Dec 3 of flooded entrances to two drill sites at Wilbarger and Quail road…we need drones out there this weekend seeing if those padsite sites go under. Last weekend the padsite near Village Creek Waste Water Plant went under with Trinity flooding….

Screen shot 2015-12-01 at 1.07.05 PM

pic by Mary Kelleher

Next month these Quicksilver sites go up for auction and we need to permanently shut them in to protect our drinking water sources or we don’t have a town if we don’t have water….or we have a town full of sick people who can’t prove what poisoned them …remember we drank the pharmaceuticals? Remember we had a spill into Lake Arlington from a Quicksilver padsite in July of 2010…we drank that too.

On 12/5/15 in Burleson Joe Gildersleeve, Arlington TX water resource services manager, presented at the Lake Arlington-Village Creek Water Protection Plan* kick off meeting. His slide listed gas drilling as one of the threats to Lake Arlington….

Screen shot 2015-12-11 at 11.15.12 PM

Video link

He also mentioned the 2011 Lake Arlington Master Plan**.

Stakeholders such as TCEQ/NCTCOG/City of Ft Worth, & Burleson also gave presentations or support for the Trinity River Authority who will test monthly for one year starting in May of 2016 at these locations….DSCN4276

to characterize the water for main constituents of concern such as E.coli, Nitrates & Chlorophyll….DSCN4273

The Arlington BarnettShaleHellblogger attended and asked if they would gear the testing to discerning if drilling effluents are risking water quality…was told the NORM was too expensive to test for (read here when Arlington turned down an offer to help coordinate Duke University who offered to test our NORM in our Barnett Shale produced water), but after the meeting was told that maybe arsenic could be added to the screening panel…..

Here is the video of Angela Kilpatrick, Senior Environmental Scientist of the Trinity River Authority addressing my question if what they test for will help pin point if drilling is affecting the study areas….her initial answer was the TSS (Total Suspended Solids) as an indicator or produced water spills.

 

End coverage of TRA meeting.

—————————-

**Begin interesting tidbits of 2011 Lake Arlington Master Plan with the most important one on pg 511 “Under this scenario, an average a gas well site point source is estimated to contribute 7,100 lbs of TSS annually to the receiving waters in the watershed“.

Page 437 shows the water test results.

Screen shot 2015-12-11 at 11.09.52 PM

2011 Lake Arlington Master Plan flows

Lake Arlington Master Plan pg 21: “A significant portion of the drinking water that the citizens of Arlington receive from the Water Utilities Department ultimately comes from springs, stormwater runoff and tributaries within the Village Creek watershed that drains into Lake Arlington.”

pg 40 “4.2.4 Gas Well Development Over the years there has been public concern about the safety, potential pollution and visual impacts of natural gas drilling operations that are located near Lake Arlington. During the Lake Arlington Master Plan process, representatives from the gas well development companies participated in discussions regarding runoff/pollution control measures and aesthetic practices. As part of the process the planning team provided recommendations for aesthetic practices to be incorporated in permits given to drillers. These areas include screening, vegetation and plantings and restoration once a site has been abandoned. In addition, the planning team developed recommendations for lakeside trail routings through properties owned by the drilling companies. These recommendations were provided by the City to the drilling companies. The Master Plan also includes BMPs for water quality protection to specifically address gas well drilling operations”.

pg 51.”An emergency spillway is used to release water during flood events when the elevation of the lake rises above the outlet structure and the inflow exceeds the capacity of the discharge conduit. The uncontrolled emergency spillway is a cut in the right (or east) end of the embankment. It has a length of 882 feet and a crest elevation of 559.7 feet above msl, which is 9.7 feet above the lip of the drop inlet structure. The drainage area of Lake Arlington is 143 square miles in size. According to an April 1999 Memorandum Report Investigation of Lake Arlington Operation Policies prepared for the Tarrant Regional Water District (TRWD), the average inflow into the reservoir from the watershed is approximately 30,000 acre-feet per year, however, the 1978 inflow was only 2,720 acre-feet. The average annual evaporation from the reservoir is 3.09 feet. The 1999 Memorandum Report states that the calculated firm yield of Lake Arlington is approximately 6,000 acre-feet per year (ac-ft/yr)”.

Here is the ELEVATIONS chart…on pg 57

Screen shot 2015-12-12 at 12.07.57 AMNow see where the tan squares are in the picture below…

Screen shot 2015-12-12 at 12.15.38 AMSo the city or some citizen hero should deploy a drone after our rains this weekend and see if the drill sites are communicating with our drinking water source… drilling padsite run off requires more disinfectants added at the water treatment plant and that means higher “legal” byproduct trihalomethane poisoning too.

FEB 2016 update…on water protection masterplanning and my concern for appropraite frack related runoff testing….

—– Forwarded Message —–
From: “Kuitu, Michael J” <mkuitu@tamu.edu>
To: kim feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2016 10:53 AM
Subject: RE: Q on TX watershed steward program

Kim,

In regards to your question, there are multiple parties that have a role in determining the appropriate analytical tests to perform for various water bodies (surface water, drinking water, groundwater, etc.).  If a Watershed Protection Plan is being created, one or more of several entities will have likely be sampling surface water.  The entities that sample surface water commonly include river authorities, volunteers, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), and more.  The following link will direct you to the information showing what entity samples the surface water for each individual river, etc.: https://cms.lcra.org/ (once you select a specific water body, you will likely see that the Sampling entity  column (labled at the top as SE) only provides a two letter code.  The easiest way to know what each two letters mean/determine the full name of the sampling entity is to use the list found at this link:http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/assets/public/compliance/monops/water/wdma/dmrg/dmrg_ch4.pdf

In regards to urban runoff, the TCEQ manages urban non-point source pollution.  In Texas’ water and land, the TCEQ also manages spills and releases of industrial chemicals that can result in an exceedance of a Protective Concentration Level (PCL) for a specified chemical.  Depending upon what chemical is spilt, certain chemicals will be tested for in soil, water, and/or groundwater.  For example, if gasoline is spilt into soil and groundwater, arsenic in addition to the other gasoline-related chemicals might be sampled for simply due to chemical reactions/chemical characteristics that can occur during the assimilation/breaking down of the spilt gasoline.

In regards to reassurances, the fact that multiple entities (cities, TCEQ, volunteers, etc.) sample both surface water and groundwater, and analyze those waters for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (such compounds include gasoline, chlorinated solvents, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and more), metals, bacteria, nutrients, dissolved oxygen, pH, and more.  If a regulatory exceedance of a chemical or certain parameter is found it is to be reported and generally tested again.  Multiple universities and government agencies have, and continue to study the environment (air, soil, surface water, and groundwater) surrounding hydraulic fracturing sites.  One such study can be found here: http://www.epa.gov/hfstudy while other information from the USGS can be found here: http://water.usgs.gov/owq/topics/hydraulic-fracturing/

In regards to TTHM or Total Trihalomethanes, they normally result from organic matter reacting with chlorine in a drinking water system.  If an exceedance of TTHM was reported for the Arlington, TX area, the city of Arlington and/or the TCEQ Public Drinking Water section (http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/drinkingwater/pdw_contact.html) might have an estimated reason for that if it was not from a natural cause.  This is because they city will be sampling their water for a variety of compounds and chemicals, and if a regulatory exceedance of TTHM is reported, they might have information as to the assumed origin of the organic matter (i.e., natural or potentially otherwise) that reacted (as  is natural) with the chlorine to form the TTHM.

Regards,

Michael

Michael Kuitu

Extension Program Specialist

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

2474 TAMU

College Station, TX 77843-2474

mkuitu@tamu.edu

Office: 979-862-4457

Fax:      979-845-0604

From: kim feil [mailto:kimfeil@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2016 11:08 AM
To: Kuitu, Michael J <mkuitu@tamu.edu>
Subject: Q on TX watershed steward program

Please direct me to those who decide which water tests to take for a watershed protection program. My interest is in the run off and spills risk and acid rain from all the industrial processes especially all the urban drilling. I was told testing for NORM is cost prohibitive. 

That the state doesn’t test for chemicals on FracFocus Chemical Disclosure Registry is troubling to start with. What reassurances can we have that certain tests are focused to uncover what harm the industry has had so far in all this drilling frenzy? So far I have found a correlation? of TTHM’s going up in Arlington TX’s drinking water by a factor of 2.6 (starting in 2007-about when we started Urban Drilling). Likewise I have seen Ft Worth’s TTHM’s drop since urban drilling has slowed down in recent years.  Please advise.

=========================================================================

* The Village Creek Lake Arlington Water Protection Plan includes testing the water in different locations and I’ve been trying to see WHAT we should be testing for now that drilling has taken hold in a big way in our watersheds….

—– Forwarded Message —–
From: kim feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
To: Jane Lynn
Sent: Saturday, August 6, 2016 12:05 PM
Subject: Fw: the city $$ part in the Village Creek-Lake Arlington Water Protection PLan screening
Jane, thanks for reminding me to make sure I don’t help them “cover” up things by not looking for them!!
—– Forwarded Message —–
From: kim feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
To: “joe.gildersleeve@arlingtontx.gov” <joe.gildersleeve@arlingtontx.gov>
Cc: Trey Yelverton <trey.yelverton@arlingtontx.gov>; Buzz Pishkur <buzz.pishkur@arlingtontx.gov>; Charlie Parker <charlie.parker@arlingtontx.gov>; Lana Wolff <lana.wolff@arlingtontx.gov>; Robert Rivera <robert.rivera@arlingtontx.gov>; Jim Parajon <jim.parajon@arlingtontx.gov>; Michael Glaspie <michael.glaspie@arlingtontx.gov>; Kathryn Wilemon <kathryn.wilemon@arlingtontx.gov>; Sheri Capehart <sheri.capehart@arlingtontx.gov>; Robert Shepard <robert.shepard@arlingtontx.gov>; Jeff Williams <jeff.williams@arlingtontx.gov>; Cynthia Simmons <cynthia.simmons@arlingtontx.gov>; John Dugan <john.dugan@arlingtontx.gov>; “revans@nctcog.org” <revans@nctcog.org>
Sent: Saturday, August 6, 2016 12:04 PM
Subject: the city $$ part in the Village Creek-Lake Arlington Water Protection PLan screening

 

Mr Gildersleeve since you are representing the city/their financing part in the Village Creek-Lake Arlington Water Protection Plan (sorry you could not make that last meeting)…some of the steering committee members had some concerns of not having the representation of experts who did NOT have ties to the oil & gas industry. I am determined we ensure that we look for the right frack related effluents.
Please tell me how you can assist? One way that I can think of is if the TRA does not design/budget those screenings for TOC, radionuclides, chloride, bromide, etc… that the city(s) itself PAY UTAclear or Duke University to do it.
Thanks
Kim Feil
– Forwarded Message —–
From: kim feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
To: Aaron Hoff <hoffa@trinityra.org>; Angela Kilpatrick <kilpatricka@trinityra.org>; “tmdl@tceq.texas.gov” <tmdl@tceq.texas.gov>
Cc: Kevin A. Schug <kschug@uta.edu>; Zacariah Hildenbrand <zac@informenv.com>; “Revans@nctcog.org” <Revans@nctcog.org>; Ph.D. Avner Vengosh <vengosh@duke.edu>
Sent: Saturday, August 6, 2016 10:26 AM
Subject: Q on what to screen for to get at the heart of O&G spillage viligence
Two things:
1) For the TWON workshop I hope information is given to the well owners/caretakers on what Nitrates, TDS, and bacteria found indicate “exposures from” such as feces, fertilizers, etc. so that if folks do have drilling near them, they understand what other tests they “should” be doing to be on the alert for. Drilling and frack chemical effluents could be in their watershed and includes frac sand mining, drilling mud farming, road construction with drilling mud, or road spraying with drilling brine too. To complicate things we have in town MSD (Municipal Setting Designations) to forever forgive Brownfield clean up (for example where old gasoline stations use to be).
2) In the first kick off meeting in Burleson, for the Village-Creek Lake Arlington Protection Plan, a slide showed parameters to understand the loadings and so my interest in the Plan is to ensure we are looking for oil & gas effluents (especially radionuclides) since the fracking build out is undeniably in the mix of risks we have to be vigilant for.
DSCN4273
Would VSS cover the effluents from oil & gas industry?
What to test for to screen for the presence of frac chemicals?
 
In understanding the limitations of the EPA frac water study released at the end of July recently, I hope the local & state experts can help me feel comfortable that it is no longer business as usual in testing the traditional effluents in our ground & surface waters now that we have to live with the huge build out of HVHF, thanks.
Kim
—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Zacariah Hildenbrand <zac@informenv.com>
To: kim feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
Cc: Kevin A. Schug <kschug@uta.edu>
Sent: Saturday, August 6, 2016 8:21 AM
Subject: Re: Fw: Q on what to screen for to get a heart of O&G spillage

Good Morning Kim,

Avner is certainly right in that a superficial look at nitrate, TDS, and bacteria will not provide enough insight regarding drilling-related contamination. In the very least you would want to examine total organic carbon as a sentinel look at chemical compounds. Also, looking at chloride and bromide levels can be an indication of industrial brine mixing so I would include that as well. In my opinion, nitrate and bacteria will provide insight regarding possible agricultural contamination, but without other variables being examined, it is not that useful.
All the best,
ZLH

 

Zacariah Hildenbrand, Ph.D.
Inform Environmental, LLC

6060 N. Central Expressway, Suite 500
Dallas, Texas 75206

zac@informenv.com

C: 915-694-7132

O: 214-800-2829

 

On Fri, Aug 5, 2016 at 8:54 PM, kim feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Please note Dr Vengosh’s remarks and assist on what we should be screenin for.
—– Forwarded Message —–
From: kim feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
To: Aaron Hoff <hoffa@trinityra.org>; Angela Kilpatrick <kilpatricka@trinityra.org>
Sent: Friday, August 5, 2016 10:46 PM
Subject: Q on what to screen for to get a heart of O&G spillage
Dr Vengosh’s comments are troubling….any ideas?

—– Forwarded Message —–
From: “Avner Vengosh, Ph.D.” <vengosh@duke.edu>
To: kim feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2016 9:51 PM
Subject: Re: Q on what to screen for to get a heart of O&G spillage

Hi Kim,

Measurement of TDS, bacteria, and nitrate is certainly NOT good enough to detect anything ! and not spills or fracking chemicals. TDS alone without chemistry cannot detect anything because not all saline water is derived from oil and gas wastewater, particularly in TX.  In our lab we charge $30 per sample for full chemistry (major and trace elements) that can give an answer for the level and the source of contamination.
I am not sure who is the scientist who is designing this monitoring program but it seems that there is no scientific merit to it, and its simply waste of money.
I hope it helps..
Best,
Avner
Avner Vengosh, PhD
Professor of Geochemistry and Water Quality,
Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Nicholas School of the Environment
205 Old Chemistry Building; Box 90227
Duke University
Durham, NC 27708Phones: office (919) 681-8050; Lab: (919) 681-0638; Fax (919) 684-5833
E-mail: vengosh@duke.edu
Duke web site: http://www.nicholas.duke.edu/people/faculty/vengosh.html
Group web site: http://sites.nicholas.duke.edu/avnervengosh/
On Aug 4, 2016, at 11:25 AM, kim feil wrote:

 

Dr Vengosh, please assist with these questions or forward to any students that can help, thanks.
In addition to the water well testing mentioned below, the TRA is assisting TCEQ who has been given money from the EPA for watershed protection planning.
Is testing for TDS, bacteria, and nitrates good enough to detect BTEX, and frack chemicals?
I was told TDS was good for detecting oil & gas activity…and if the numbers are high that then more specialized testing could then be performed.
I’m not sure about frack chemical testing?
And then there is the mud farming effluents and any firefighting chemicals so we want to be sure that our two year testing includes looking for these threats.

 ======================================


From: Zacariah Hildenbrand <zac@informenv.com>
To: kim feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
Cc: Kevin A. Schug <kschug@uta.edu>
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2016 1:12 PM
Subject: Re: Fw: Water Well Owner Workshop – Get your well water tested for $10

Hello Kim,

Thank you for forwarding this message on to us. A couple of things stick out to us: 1) TDS (total dissolved solids) is a useful parameter to track in the potential influx of brine solutions, however 2) TOC (total organic carbon) is a much better metric of tracking potential VOC contamination. For example, an elevated TOC value can be indicative of exogenous chemicals being present (ie. BTEX, alcohols. or chlorinated compounds) and is a good sentinel analysis prior to performing a full VOC screening.

Our lab specializes in TOC measurements and we would be happy to process samples with this analysis if there is some grant money to support these efforts. If you know of an avenue for us to provide our services please let us know

Thank you for your time and consideration,

ZLH

 

Zacariah Hildenbrand, Ph.D.
Inform Environmental, LLC

6060 N. Central Expressway, Suite 500
Dallas, Texas 75206

zac@informenv.com

C: 915-694-7132

O: 214-800-2829
————————–end string———–
—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Dania Grundma <dania.grundmann@tceq.texas.gov>
To: “kimfeil@sbcglobal.net” <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
Cc: Faith Hambleton <Faith.Hambleton@tceq.texas.gov>
Sent: Monday, August 8, 2016 10:13 AM
Subject: RE: Q on what to screen for to get at the heart of O&G spillage viligence

Ms. Feil,

Thank you for your interest in the Village Creek – Lake Arlington WPP.  The information you have provided has been provided to Faith Hambleton, the TCEQ grant manager for this project.

Best Regards,

Dania Grundmann

TMDL Program

—————————–end———

—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Buzz Pishkur <Buzz.Pishkur@arlingtontx.gov>
To: ‘kim feil’ <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>; Joe Gildersleeve <Joe.Gildersleeve@arlingtontx.gov>
Cc: Trey Yelverton <Trey.Yelverton@arlingtontx.gov>; Charlie Parker <Charlie.Parker@arlingtontx.gov>; Lana Wolff <Lana.Wolff@arlingtontx.gov>; Robert Rivera <Robert.Rivera@arlingtontx.gov>; Jim Parajon <Jim.Parajon@arlingtontx.gov>; Michael Glaspie <Michael.Glaspie@arlingtontx.gov>; Kathryn Wilemon <Kathryn.Wilemon@arlingtontx.gov>; Sheri Capehart <Sheri.Capehart@arlingtontx.gov>; Robert Shepard <Robert.Shepard@arlingtontx.gov>; Jeff Williams <Jeff.Williams@arlingtontx.gov>; Cynthia Simmons <Cynthia.Simmons@arlingtontx.gov>; John Dugan <John.Dugan@arlingtontx.gov>; “revans@nctcog.org” <revans@nctcog.org>; Traci L. Peterson <Traci.Peterson@arlingtontx.gov>; Joe Gildersleeve <Joe.Gildersleeve@arlingtontx.gov>; Craig Cummings <Craig.Cummings@arlingtontx.gov>
Sent: Tuesday, August 9, 2016 3:20 PM
Subject: RE: the city $$ part in the Village Creek-Lake Arlington Water Protection PLan screening

Kim:  The Watershed protection plan (WPP) process started due to Village Creek being designated as an impaired body of water because of specific contaminants being “present” in the stream flow. The constituent in this case is total coliform. The City of Arlington is but a participant with several other Cities and government agencies in the development of the WPP which is now well underway. We must have an approved WPP in place to be eligible for USEPA grants (section 319 funds) to help fund future mitigation efforts.  The plan developed and approved is expected to identify sources of coliform in the watershed, such as septic systems, feedlot operations, public owned wastewater treatment plant discharges and other such potential contributors to the total coliform count in the stream. The process we are participating in is well established nationwide and we do not plan to deviate from the scope established at the outset. To the best of my knowledge there is no known basis in science or fact to suggest that fracking operations have ever contributed positively or negatively to the water quality of Lake Arlington and thus to redirect the study groups time or resources to that end does not seem to appropriate at this time. Remember we are but one entity in the watershed-wide collaboration to improve the quality of Village Creek and Lake Arlington. We are very cognizant of Lake’s water quality and how it could potentially impact recreation and drinking water of our residents. To that end we routinely test the water from the Lake as part of quality control process.

From: kim feil [mailto:kimfeil@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Saturday, August 06, 2016 12:04 PM
To: Joe Gildersleeve
Cc: Trey Yelverton; Buzz Pishkur; Charlie Parker; Lana Wolff; Robert Rivera; Jim Parajon; Michael Glaspie; Kathryn Wilemon; Sheri Capehart; Robert Shepard; Jeff Williams; Cynthia Simmons; John Dugan; revans@nctcog.org
Subject: the city $$ part in the Village Creek-Lake Arlington Water Protection PLan screening

Mr Gildersleeve since you are representing the city/their financing part in the Village Creek-Lake Arlington Water Protection Plan (sorry you could not make that last meeting)…some of the steering committee members had some concerns of not having the representation of experts who did NOT have ties to the oil & gas industry. I am determined we ensure that we look for the right frack related effluents.

Please tell me how you can assist? One way that I can think of is if the TRA does not design/budget those screenings for TOC, radionuclides, chloride, bromide, etc… that the city(s) itself PAY UTAclear or Duke University to do it.

Thanks

Kim Feil

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About Kim Triolo Feil

Since TX Statute 253.005 forbids drilling in heavily settled municipalities, I unsuccessfully ran for City Council Seat to try to enforce this. Since Urban Drilling, our drinking water has almost tripled for TTHM's. Before moving to Arlington in 1990, I lived in Norco’s “cancer alley”, a refinery town. It was only after Urban Drilling in Arlington did I start having health effects. After our drill site was established closest to my home, the chronic nosebleeds started. I know there are more canaries here in Arlington having reactions to our industrialized airshed (we have 55-60 padsites of gas wells). Come forward and report to me those having health issues especially if you live to the north/northwest of a drill site so I can map your health effects on this blog. My youtube account is KimFeilGood. FAIR USE NOTICE: THIS SITE MAY CONTAIN COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL THE USE OF WHICH HAS NOT ALWAYS BEEN SPECIFICALLY AUTHORIZED BY THE COPYRIGHT OWNER. MATERIAL FROM DIVERSE AND SOMETIMES TEMPORARY SOURCES IS BEING MADE AVAILABLE IN A PERMANENT UNIFIED MANNER, AS PART OF AN EFFORT TO ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH EMINENT DOMAIN AND THE PRIVATIZATION OF PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE (AMONG OTHER THINGS). IT IS BELIEVED THAT THIS IS A 'FAIR USE' OF THE INFORMATION AS ALLOWED UNDER SECTION 107 OF THE US COPYRIGHT LAW. IN ACCORDANCE WITH TITLE 17 USC SECTION 107, THE SITE IS MAINTAINED WITHOUT PROFIT FOR THOSE WHO ACCESS IT FOR RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE: HTTP://WWW.LAW.CORNELL.EDU/ TO USE MATERIAL REPRODUCED ON THIS SITE FOR PURPOSES THAT GO BEYOND 'FAIR USE', PERMISSION IS REQUIRED FROM THE COPYRIGHT OWNER INDICATED WITH A NAME AND INTERNET LINK AT THE END OF EACH ITEM. (NOTE: THE TEXT OF THIS NOTICE WAS ALSO LIFTED FROM CORRIDORNEWS.BLOGSPOT.COM)
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