Skittles Taste the Brinebow

Water consumers have different thresholds for odors and taste and the

©2015 Water Research Foundation  report has broken down effulents in water as it relates to guidelines and sensory properties. I boldfaced items and went straight to the fracking risk related pieces….

Page 19 …

“Chloride occurs naturally in fresh, estuarine or salt water from dissolution of rocks and minerals.” 

“While their individual natural sources are varied, the anthropogenic sources of sodium and chloride can be similar, such as deicing agents for roads, brines from desalination of estuarine or sea water, and brines from hydraulic fracturing fluids”. 

Page 20…

Future Implications

“Neither sodium nor chloride is removed by conventional treatment, so their levels in drinking water are likely to increase when their levels in source waters increase due to inputs from anthropogenic sources. Natural sources of chloride and sodium can be heavily supplemented by deicing salt, urban and agricultural runoff, discharges from municipal and industrial wastewater facilities, and oil and gas drilling, such as hydraulic fracturing (EPA 1988).”

With the expected increase of hydraulic fracturing to produce natural gas, there is the possibility that some of the chemicals from fracturing operations will directly or indirectly affect ground and surface waters that are used for drinking water. Flowback waters from hydraulic fracturing operations are reported to contain from 3,000-150,000 mg Cl- /L and 2,000-100,000 mg Na/L (WEF 2012), while produced water can contain 6,000- 200,000 mg Cl- /L and 4,000-135,000 mg Na/L (WEF 2012). These concentrations are 1,000- 10,000 greater than those typically found in drinking water. Both fracturing water types may also contain bromide, which will produce a more intense taste with sodium than chloride”.

The City of Arlington is moving to trenchless pipe replacement of metal by pigging HDPE high density polyethlene piping, but I have been warning that if there is any contamination present in the soils in our MSD & Urban Drilling town that VOC’s (particularily Benzene-the Houdini of hydrocarbons) could leech into plastic drinking water piping. Page 26 & 27 speaks of HDPE plastic piping ITSELF causing water contamination issues related to corrosion. However the city is using a corrosion resisant HDPE piping. In February of 2016 the City of Arlington reported.

“Pre-chlorinated pipe bursting is one method to replace underground pipe without digging a trench down the road. Eighty five percent of the work occurs underground. This technique allows hundreds of feet of jointless pipe to be installed with minimal excavation, which means less damage to existing landscaping and roadway surfaces and shorter construction schedules”.

Even if this pre-chlorinated HDPE piping resists corrosion…is it guaranteed to resist toxins in the soil that can come in contact with it? After all we now live in a town that has allowed Municipal Setting Designations (to forgive known Brownfield clean up) and Urban Drilling.

The Water Research Foundation concludes its “plastics piping” report on page 27….“While corrosion has historically focused on metallic materials, in the future the “gradually destroying materials by chemical reaction with the environment” needs to be considered for polymer materials in contact with drinking water”. 

————-

My cases against Urban Drilling AND the city using HDPE drinking water piping just keeps getting stronger.


—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Buzz Pishkur <Buzz.Pishkur@arlingtontx.gov>
To: ‘kim feil’ <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>; Darryl Westbrook <Darryl.Westbrook@arlingtontx.gov>; “michael.buettner@arlingtontx.gov” <michael.buettner@arlingtontx.gov>; Craig Cummings <Craig.Cummings@arlingtontx.gov>; Patricia Jackson <Patricia.Jackson@arlingtontx.gov>; Brad Franklin <Brad.Franklin@arlingtontx.gov>; Jessie Allen <Jessie.Allen@arlingtontx.gov>
Cc: Robert Rivera <Robert.Rivera@arlingtontx.gov>; Michael Glaspie <Michael.Glaspie@arlingtontx.gov>; Lana Wolff <Lana.Wolff@arlingtontx.gov>; Charlie Parker <Charlie.Parker@arlingtontx.gov>; Sheri Capehart <Sheri.Capehart@arlingtontx.gov>; Kathryn Wilemon <Kathryn.Wilemon@arlingtontx.gov>; Robert Shepard <Robert.Shepard@arlingtontx.gov>; Jim Parajon <Jim.Parajon@arlingtontx.gov>; Trey Yelverton <Trey.Yelverton@arlingtontx.gov>; Cynthia Simmons <Cynthia.Simmons@arlingtontx.gov>; Jeff Williams <Jeff.Williams@arlingtontx.gov>; Victoria Farrar-Myers <Victoria.Farrar-Myers@arlingtontx.gov>; John Dugan <John.Dugan@arlingtontx.gov>
Sent: Friday, June 24, 2016 1:53 PM
Subject: RE: Trenchless Digging & Water Research Foundation

Kim:  We are and have been aware of the realities of using petroleum based piping which we know as  PVC, HDPE, C900 etc. We have design specifications that will address this for “all” areas of town where a high potential for leeching may be present.  Such areas would include property near fuel stations, identified contaminated areas, and others. This issue can also be discussed when the next request for funding of a pipe bursting project is presented to Council. To date we have only used HDPE in residential replacement projects none of which are in a high risk zone. However,  PVC pipe has been a standard pipe material for small diameter water and sewer lines in Arlington and many other communities for many years.  

Please note that Michael Buettner is no longer employed at the City of Arlington.

 


—– Forwarded Message —–
From: kim feil <kimfeil@sbcglobal.net>
To: Buzz Pishkur <buzz.pishkur@arlingtontx.gov>; Darryl Westbrook <darryl.westbrook@arlingtontx.gov>; “michael.buettner@arlingtontx.gov” <michael.buettner@arlingtontx.gov>
Cc: Robert Rivera <robert.rivera@arlingtontx.gov>; Michael Glaspie <michael.glaspie@arlingtontx.gov>; Lana Wolff <lana.wolff@arlingtontx.gov>; Charlie Parker <charlie.parker@arlingtontx.gov>; Sheri Capehart <sheri.capehart@arlingtontx.gov>; Kathryn Wilemon <kathryn.wilemon@arlingtontx.gov>; Robert Shepard <robert.shepard@arlingtontx.gov>; Jim Parajon <jim.parajon@arlingtontx.gov>; Trey Yelverton <trey.yelverton@arlingtontx.gov>; Cynthia Simmons <cynthia.simmons@arlingtontx.gov>; Jeff Williams <jeff.williams@arlingtontx.gov>; Victoria Myers <victoria.farrar-myers@arlingtontx.gov>; “john.dugan@arlingtontx.gov” <john.dugan@arlingtontx.gov>
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2016 9:02 PM
Subject: Re: Trenchless Digging & Water Research Foundation
 
 
Mr Pushkur HDPE piping “itself” has drinking water contamination issues. As the City of Arlington is moving to trenchless pipe replacement of metal by pigging HDPE high density polyethlene piping, but I have been warning that if there is any contamination present in the soils in our MSD & Urban Drilling town that VOC’s (particularily Benzene-the Houdini of hydrocarbons) could leech into plastic drinking water piping. Page 26 & 27 of the Water Research Foundation, http://www.waterrf.org/PublicReportLibrary/4537.pdf speaks of HDPE plastic piping ITSELF causing corrosion water contamination issues that I understand the city is ahead of that problem BUT even if this pre-chlorinated HDPE piping resists corrosion…is it guaranteed to resist toxins in the soil that can come in contact with it? After all we now live in a town that has allowed Municipal Setting Designations (to forgive known Brownfield clean up) and Urban Drilling.
The Water Research Foundation concludes its “plastics piping” report….“While corrosion has historically focused on metallic materials, in the future the “gradually destroying materials by chemical reaction with the environment” needs to be considered for polymer materials in contact with drinking water”. 
————-
My cases against Urban Drilling AND the city using HDPE drinking water piping just keeps getting stronger.
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About Kim Triolo Feil

Since TX Statute 253.005 forbids drilling in heavily settled municipalities, I unsuccessfully ran for City Council Seat to try to enforce this. Since Urban Drilling, our drinking water has almost tripled for TTHM's. Before moving to Arlington in 1990, I lived in Norco’s “cancer alley”, a refinery town. It was only after Urban Drilling in Arlington did I start having health effects. After our drill site was established closest to my home, the chronic nosebleeds started. I know there are more canaries here in Arlington having reactions to our industrialized airshed (we have 55-60 padsites of gas wells). Come forward and report to me those having health issues especially if you live to the north/northwest of a drill site so I can map your health effects on this blog. My youtube account is KimFeilGood. FAIR USE NOTICE: THIS SITE MAY CONTAIN COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL THE USE OF WHICH HAS NOT ALWAYS BEEN SPECIFICALLY AUTHORIZED BY THE COPYRIGHT OWNER. MATERIAL FROM DIVERSE AND SOMETIMES TEMPORARY SOURCES IS BEING MADE AVAILABLE IN A PERMANENT UNIFIED MANNER, AS PART OF AN EFFORT TO ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH EMINENT DOMAIN AND THE PRIVATIZATION OF PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE (AMONG OTHER THINGS). IT IS BELIEVED THAT THIS IS A 'FAIR USE' OF THE INFORMATION AS ALLOWED UNDER SECTION 107 OF THE US COPYRIGHT LAW. IN ACCORDANCE WITH TITLE 17 USC SECTION 107, THE SITE IS MAINTAINED WITHOUT PROFIT FOR THOSE WHO ACCESS IT FOR RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE: HTTP://WWW.LAW.CORNELL.EDU/ TO USE MATERIAL REPRODUCED ON THIS SITE FOR PURPOSES THAT GO BEYOND 'FAIR USE', PERMISSION IS REQUIRED FROM THE COPYRIGHT OWNER INDICATED WITH A NAME AND INTERNET LINK AT THE END OF EACH ITEM. (NOTE: THE TEXT OF THIS NOTICE WAS ALSO LIFTED FROM CORRIDORNEWS.BLOGSPOT.COM)
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