Hurricane Harvey Refinery Upset Pics- Benzene Pollution Info

10/3/2017 Here is the EPA link to individual superfund sites (that were Harvey-disturbed?) update, https://response.epa.gov/site/doc_list.aspx?site_id=12353.

Here is the EPA/TCEQ update:

EPA/TCEQ: updated status of systems affected by Harvey

“Air quality improving, number of water systems operational increasing in affected areas.

Working together, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality continue to coordinate with local, state and federal officials to address the human health and environmental impacts of Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath, especially the water systems in the affected areas.

As part of this coordination, a Unified Command was established between the EPA, the TCEQ, the General Land Office, and the U.S. Coast Guard to oversee all emergency response efforts. This Unified Command is supported by three operational branches in Corpus Christi, Houston, and Port Arthur. In addition to the EPA, the TCEQ, the GLO, and the USCG, multiple agencies and groups are supporting each of the operational branches, including the Texas National Guard, 6th Civil Support Team; the Arkansas National Guard, 61st Civil Support Team; the Oklahoma Task Force 1; and the Texas State Guard Engineering Group. Branch personnel are working to continuously monitor water and wastewater systems, as well as conducting hazmat reconnaissance/recovery operations for orphan drums and containers and to assess spills or discharges as a result of the storm.

As of Friday, Sept 29, the following information is available:

Drinking Water: To date, about 2,238 drinking water systems have been affected by Harvey. Of those, 38 have boil-water notices, and five are inoperable. The TCEQ are contacting remaining systems to gather updated information on their status. Assistance teams are in the field working directly with system operators to expedite getting systems back to operational status.

Wastewater and Sewage: The TCEQ has made contact with 1,743 wastewater treatment plants in the 58 counties within the Governor’s Disaster Declaration. Of those, seven are inoperable in the affected counties. The agencies are aware that releases of wastewater from sanitary sewers are occurring as a result of the historic flooding and are actively working to monitor facilities that have reported spills. Additionally, the agencies are conducting outreach and providing technical guidance to all other wastewater facilities in flood-impacted areas. Assistance teams will continue to be deployed to work directly with system operators to expedite getting systems back to operational status.

On Sept. 25, 2017, the EPA provided written explanation to FEMA allowing proceeds from State Revolving Loan Funds to be used to address immediate recovery and future resiliency efforts in Texas. The EPA is also reviewing a Texas Water Development Board request that certain water infrastructure projects be exempt from American Iron and Steel requirements. The public interest waiver request from the TWDB is posted for the required 15-day public comment period which closes Oct. 13, 2017.

Critical Water Infrastructure: The TCEQ has made contact with the owners of the 340 dams in the impacted areas. There are 17 dams that have reported some type of damage; four of these dams failed. There have been no reports of downstream damage or loss of life.

Additional EPA/TCEQ updates include:

  • Superfund Sites: The EPA and the TCEQ continue to get updates about the status of specific sites from the parties responsible for ongoing cleanup of the sites. The TCEQ has completed the assessment of all 17 state Superfund sites in the affected area. There were no major issues noted. The TCEQ will continue to monitor sites to ensure no further action is needed in regards to the storm.All 43 Superfund NPL sites in the hurricane affected area in Texas and Louisiana have been assessed. Of these, 42 sites have been cleared. Post-hurricane summaries based on preliminary data are online (www.epa.gov/hurricane-harvey). Quality assured data reports for Superfund sites are being posted online as they are received.The San Jacinto River Waste Pits site requires additional follow up. The EPA received preliminary data from sediment samples collected by the EPA’s dive team from fourteen areas at the San Jacinto River Waste Pits Superfund site. Samples from one of the fourteen areas confirmed the protective cap had been damaged and the underlying waste material was exposed. The sample showed dioxins above 70,000 ng/kg. The EPA recommended cleanup level for the site is 30 ng/kg. The EPA is directing the potentially responsible parties to take immediate action to address damage to the protective cap and high levels of underlying waste material found at one of the samples on site. Read the EPA press release Exit the TCEQ. The EPA has also posted quality assured data collected by the potentially responsible parties on the website.
  • Debris Management: The TCEQ has approved 178 Temporary Debris Management Sites in areas under the Federal or State Disaster Declaration designations. View a map of all Temporary Debris Management Sites.TCEQ regional offices and local authorities are actively overseeing the siting and implementation of debris and waste management plans in the affected area. The EPA, the TCEQ, and Army Corps of Engineer field observers are visiting staging and landfills to ensure compliance with guidelines. The EPA has participated in over 200 joint site observations and expects to conclude its activities next week. EPA observers have reported that the TCEQ is providing onsite compliance assistance and follow-up visits to confirm compliance with permits. The TCEQ plans to conduct site visits as long as approved debris staging areas are processing debris and transferring debris to landfills. EPA Community Liaisons continue to provide federal and state guidance and best practices to thousands of individuals that are dealing with potential hazards in damaged or lost homes. The TCEQ and the EPA released Handling Debris during Natural Disasters fact sheets in English, Spanish and Vietnamese.
  • Reconnaissance/Orphan Containers: The TCEQ continues to lead in monitoring facilities that have reported spills. Unified Command has completed initial hazmat reconnaissance and recovery activities associated with hurricane impacts. Orphan containers, which include drums and tanks, found floating in or washed up near waterways continue to be gathered, sorted and grouped by type, prior to shipping them off for safe, proper treatment and disposal. All branches of the Unified Command have collected over 1,088 orphan containers and have responded to approximately 266 reported spills or discharges. USCG and the Texas General Land Office will continue to complete Vessel Recovery activities.
  • Air Quality Monitoring: One of the many preparations for Hurricane Harvey included the EPA, the TCEQ, and other monitoring entities temporarily shutting down several air monitoring stations from the greater Houston, Corpus Christi, and Beaumont areas to protect valuable equipment from storm damage. Since then, state and local authorities have been working to get the systems up and running again as soon as possible. As of Friday, Sept. 29, the TCEQ’s air monitoring network is 100 percent operational. All measured concentrations were well below levels of health concern.

Both TCEQ and EPA investigators have spent numerous hours, both day and night, monitoring neighborhoods and industrial fence lines with hand-held instruments, such as optical gas imaging cameras (OGIC), toxic vapor analyzers, summa canisters, and portable multi-gas monitors. The use of these tools allows for the most effective source identification for drifting volatile organic compound (VOC) plumes so that swift action can be taken to address the cause of these emissions. TCEQ investigators in the Houston, Corpus Christi, and Beaumont regional offices routinely conduct reconnaissance monitoring near industrial fence lines and adjacent communities. Reconnaissance monitoring has been conducted in these areas with increased frequency to identify potential emission sources. In furthering efforts to monitor storm impacted areas and address emission sources, the TCEQ conducted aerial surveys in the Houston and Beaumont areas using a helicopter equipped with an OGIC that can image VOCs and other hydrocarbons invisible to the eye, and the EPA’s Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) plane conducted real-time sampling of potential emission targets. Additionally, the EPA completed air quality analyses using their Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) mobile monitoring system. The results from continuous air monitors, hand-held instruments, ASPECT, and TAGA have shown no levels of immediate health concern and summary information is available at www.epa.gov/hurricane-harvey. The EPA has completed its air monitoring activities, and both TAGA and ASPECT have been demobilized.

For additional information, please visit the TCEQ’s Hurricane Response website.

View the EPA Story Map about Hurricane Harvey Response activities”.

9/19/26/17 https://www.democracynow.org/2017/9/26/fenceline_communities_on_gulf_coast_face

9/20/2017 update from http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Private-air-quality-monitoring-detects-high-12203487.php?cmpid=btfpm#photo-14124372

“Eight days later, air monitoring in the adjacent Manchester neighborhood by the San Francisco company Entanglement Technologies detected a plume of benzene with readings nearly double the state’s allowable level for short-term exposure”.

9/12/17 updates:

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/energy/article/Gasoline-pours-from-Ship-Channel-tanks-12190085.phphttp://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/energy/article/Gasoline-pours-from-Ship-Channel-tanks-12190085.php

“…gasoline spilled near the Houston Ship Channel after two storage tanks owned by an Oklahoma pipeline company sustained damage from Hurricane Harvey.

The spill, totaling more than 460,000 gallons, is the largest reported since Harvey swamped the Houston…”

http://www.pennenergy.com/articles/pennenergy/2017/09/oil-and-gas-tank-failures-in-harvey-reveal-vulnerabilities-in-storm.html?cmpid=enl_pennenergy_pennenergy_daily_petroleum_2017-09-12&email_address=kimfeil@sbcglobal.net&eid=288262587&bid=1862438

Companies have reported that roughly two dozen storage tanks holding crude oil, gasoline and other fuels collapsed or otherwise failed during Harvey, spilling a combined 140,000 gallons of fuel, according to an Associated Press analysis of state and federal accident databases. Federal rules require companies to be prepared for spills, but don’t require them to take any specific measures to secure the massive fuel storage tanks at refineries and oil production sites that are prone to float and break during floods. (Tom Fox/The Dallas Morning News via AP, file)

Here are some PennEnergy cut & paste items I found of interest abbreviated for ease of reading….”More than two dozen storage tanks holding crude oil, gasoline and other contaminants ruptured or otherwise failed … spilling at least 145,000 gallons (548,868 liters) of fuel and spewing toxic pollutants into the air,…

…tank failures follow years of warnings that the Houston area’s petrochemical industry was ill-prepared for a major storm, with about one-third of the 4,500 storage tanks along the Houston Ship Channel… susceptible to flooding…

…The tanks are prone to float and break during floods, and Harvey’s unprecedented rainfalls revealed a new vulnerability when the roofs of some storage tanks sank under the weight of so much water.

Federal and state rules require companies to be prepared for spills, but mandate no specific measures to secure storage tanks at refineries, chemical plants and oil production sites.

“Tampa Bay is one of the most vulnerable cities in the country” to hurricanes, said John Pardue, a Louisiana State University professor who has researched problems with storage tanks during storms.

“But there’s no requirement that says when you’re in a hurricane zone you’ve got to do things differently,” Pardue added. ….(RE:Hurricane Katrina that had)…ruptured storage tanks released several millions of gallons of oil including into residential areas…

One difference during Harvey was that prior to the storm, some refineries apparently were able to fill up their storage tanks to make them less buoyant …That wasn’t the case with about a dozen smaller storage tanks that experienced spills in Fayette County …

…problems among almost 400 large storage tanks in the Houston area that have “floating roofs” that go up or down depending on how much fuel is inside the containers. …Harvey caused 14 of those roofs to sink, in some instances allowing the chemicals inside them to escape…

There are no government rules dictating how tanks are designed….

At least two of the floating roof failures occurred in gasoline storage tanks at Shell Oil’s Deer Park refinery and another occurred at Exxon Mobil’s Baytown refinery.

Pollution reports submitted by the companies to Texas regulators blamed the roof problems on Harvey’s excess rainfall. The reports said air pollutants including benzene, toluene and xylene were released into the atmosphere……Shell representative said …roof problems presented an “extremely rare” circumstance and …quickly responded by spraying the spilled fuel with foam to suppress any harmful vapors. 

Exxon Mobil ….was able to lessen environmental damage from Harvey by shutting down equipment in advance. ….it’s uncertain how much spilled material flowed off-site from the storage yards, oil production areas and refineries.

(MAJOR TAKE AWAY YA’LL)Texas has rules governing protections for underground storage tanks during floods, but not for above-ground tanks…”

 

Skytruth/report a spill link here, https://skytruth.ushahidi.io/views/map

Here is a sample of the notification after it is reported, notice it has a hover function to see “REPORTED” spills/releases, check this one out here at link…

#Formosa released 1,328,850 lbs. of toxic emissions from startup after #Harvey

————————

Benzene plume was detected in air over Houston after 4 fossil fuel companies reported leaks http://www.ibtimes.com/political-capital/oil-companies-leaking-benzene-lobbied-against-pollution-rules-2586575 
9/7/2017 update:

tweeta: “Whoa. 324 ppb of benzene in Houston area is terrible. Texas uses 25 ppb for 1-hr exposure as a screening level”

 

9/5/17 update: https://twitter.com/emorwee/status/905162716423352320

Wow. Absolutely insane photos of flooding at America’s largest refinery, the Motiva facility in Port Arthur. Clear oil sheens in the water.

harvey refinery oil slicks

 

TCEQ update:

“Status of systems in areas affected by Harvey

WASHINGTON – Working together, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) continue to coordinate with local, state and federal officials to address the human health and environmental impacts of Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath, especially the water systems in the affected areas. TCEQ has 500 people and EPA 145 people assisting the response to this natural disaster. As of Sunday, Sept. 3, the following information is available:

Drinking Water: To date, about 2,000 drinking water systems potentially affected by Harvey have been contacted. Of those: 1,757 systems are fully operational, 188 have boil-water notices, and 37 are shut down. Both EPA and the TCEQ are contacting remaining systems to gather updated information of their status. EPA and the TCEQ are working closely with the Texas National Guard, including the 6th Civil Support Team (supporting TCEQ in Corpus Christi), Arkansas National Guard, 61st Civil Support Team (supporting TCEQ in Houston), and the Texas State Guard Engineering Group, and other local and state agencies to continuously monitor water systems. Assistance teams are in the field working directly with system operators to expedite getting systems back to operational status.

Waste Water and Sewage: Currently, 794 of approximately 1,219 wastewater treatment plants are fully operational in the affected counties. The agencies are aware that releases of wastewater from sanitary sewers are occurring, due to the historic flooding and are actively working to monitor facilities that have reported spills, conduct outreach and provide technical guidance to all other wastewater facilities in flood-impacted areas. EPA and TCEQ are working closely with the Texas National Guard, including the 6th Civil Support Team (supporting TCEQ in Corpus Christi), Arkansas National Guard, 61st Civil Support Team (supporting TCEQ in Houston), and the Texas State Guard Engineering Group, and other local and state agencies to continuously monitor wastewater systems. Assistance teams will be deployed to work directly with system operators to expedite getting systems back to operational status.

Residential Wells: EPA is developing a plan for sampling residential wells and is coordinating with the TCEQ to establish several locations where residents can bring water samples from their wells to be tested. If a private well is flooded, the water should not be used from the well until the following three things have occurred:

1.    Flood waters have receded from the well and the plumbing system; 
2.    The well has been disinfected as well as the plumbing;
3.    and the well has been sampled and laboratory analysis report has confirmed that the disinfected water contains no bacteriological contaminants.

Guidance for private well owners can be found at: www.tceq.texas.gov/response/hurricanes.

Flood Water: Water quality sampling will be focused on industrial facilities and hazardous waste sites. Floodwaters contain many hazards, including bacteria and other contaminants. Precautions should be taken by anyone involved in cleanup activities or any others who may be exposed to flood waters. These precautions include heeding all warnings from local and state authorities regarding safety advisories. In addition to the drowning hazards of wading, swimming, or driving in swift floodwaters, these waters can carry large objects that are not always readily visible that can cause injuries to those in the water. Other potential hazards include downed power lines and possible injuries inflicted by animals displaced by the floodwaters.

Critical Water Infrastructure: The agencies are continuing to work closely with dams. The larger dams are full in many cases and may be releasing water; the structures are secure at this time. There are 340 high- and significant-hazard dams in the impacted areas, and TCEQ has been able to make contact with 200 of these dam owners. Of these 200, only five dams have been damaged or have failed. We have also been notified that three low-hazard dams have damage. TCEQ is continuing to contact dams to get status updates.

Additional EPA/TCEQ updates include:

• Superfund Sites: EPA and TCEQ continue to get updates about the status of specific sites from the parties responsible for ongoing cleanup of the sites. The most recent information can be found at www.tceq.texas.gov/news/releases/status-of-superfund-sites-affected-by-harvey

• Air Quality Monitoring: One of the many preparations for Hurricane Harvey included EPA, TCEQ, and other monitoring entities temporarily shutting down several air monitoring stations from the greater Houston, Corpus Christi, and Beaumont areas. Since then, state and local authorities have been working to get the systems up and running again. As of Saturday, Sept. 2, more than 88 percent of monitors are up and working again in Corpus Christi, 85 percent in Houston, and 36 percent in Beaumont. The network is expected to be fully operational again by next week. Of the available air monitoring data collected from Aug. 24-Sept. 2, all measured concentrations were well below levels of health concern. Monitors are showing that air quality at this time is not concerning, and residents should not be concerned about air quality issues related to the effects of the storm. 

• Fires at Arkema Facility in Crosby: EPA and TCEQ are coordinating closely with Harris County officials, along with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and other local public safety officials. As a result of initial chemical fires while the facility was flooded, EPA has collected downstream surface water runoff samples at four locations outside the evacuation zone near residential areas. EPA and TCEQ will maintain a 24-hour watch and maintain a 24-hour presence at the incident command operations center near this facility to support local emergency personnel on the ground. The 1.5-mile radius evacuation zone remains in effect until local emergency response authorities announce it is safe.

• Refineries/Fuel Waivers: In addition to gasoline waivers for 38 states and D.C. and diesel waivers for Texas, EPA signed three No Action Assurance letters on Sept. 1 to help address fuel shortages. NAA will help expedite the distribution of existing gasoline supplies to both Texas and Louisiana, while the refineries work to re-start and resume normal operations. The waivers and NAA letters are effective until Sept. 15 and should allow for the distribution in Texas of 10 million or more gallons of fuel to consumers. 

For additional information from TCEQ, please visit http://www.tceq.texas.gov/response/hurricanes”.

9/3/17 UPDATE EPA on the defense http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/349068-epa-defends-action-on-flooded-superfund-sites-in-houston

9/2/17 update with more info here that I cut and pasted items of interest and boldfaced…

https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/national/energy-environment/ap-exclusive-toxic-waste-sites-flooded-epa-not-on-scene/2017/09/02/91202494-9003-11e7-9c53-6a169beb0953_story.html

“…he worried whether Harvey’s floodwaters had also washed in pollution from the old acid pit just a couple blocks away”.

“…the Houston metro area has more than a dozen such Superfund sites, designated by the Environmental Protection Agency as being among America’s most intensely contaminated places. Many are now flooded, with the risk that waters were stirring dangerous sediment”.

“After the water receded on Friday, a sinkhole the size of a swimming pool had opened up and swallowed two cars. The acrid smell of creosote filled the air”.

“At the Brio Refining Inc. Superfund site in Friendswood, southeast of downtown Houston, the water had receded by Saturday. There was a layer of silt on the road along with large muddy pools. A drainage ditch leading out of the fenced site was full and flowing into a nearby waterway”.

“…the San Jacinto River Waste Pits Superfund site was completely covered with floodwaters when an AP reporter saw it Thursday”.

“…warned for years about the potential for flooding to inundate Texas Superfund sites, particularly the San Jacinto Waste Pits. ‘If floodwaters have spread the chemicals in the waste pits, then dangerous chemicals like dioxin could be spread around the wider Houston area,'”

http://grist.org/article/harvey-stirs-up-a-toxic-industrial-soup/

“When Harvey forced many of these power plants and refineries to shut down, huge quantities of toxic chemicals — as much as 2 million pounds of them — were released into the air all at once. Nearby residents reported “unbearable” smells, and some were even told to “shelter in place” as authorities weighed the necessity of evacuation amid rising floodwaters”.

“… 495 of those fall within the greater Houston metropolitan area, responsible for a cumulative 1.5 billion pounds of toxic waste a year.”

“…but as the storm overwhelmed infrastructure and flooded these sites, those concentrated pools of toxins were likely mixed into the floodwaters.

“There’s no need to test it,” one Houston Health department official told the New York Times. “It’s contaminated. There’s millions of contaminants.”

There’s a lot we don’t know about the chemicals released during the storm — air monitors were turned off, and water sampling is only just beginning.”

“Along with creosote, lead, arsenic, and heavy metals may be stirred up from Houston’s old industrial sites. After Hurricane Katrina, elevated lead levels were found in New Orleans’ soil,…”

“The EPA classifies benzene as a PBT, a “persistent bioaccumulative toxin.” That means it sticks around in the environment for a long time, builds up in the food chain, and, yes, is toxic. Benzene exposure is linked to cancer in humans. A natural ingredient of crude oil,…”

“At an ExxonMobil refinery in Beaumont, Texas, storm damage led to the release of more than 1,300 pounds of sulfur dioxide. Another plant in Corpus Christi reported a release of 15,000 pounds“.

“Other gases in these plumes can include carbon monoxide, butane, propane, ethylene, particulate matter, and a nasty carcinogen called 1,3-butadiene.

“…Arkema’s malfunctioning chemical plant in the town of Crosby …organic peroxides, used in plastic manufacturing,…In the company’s worst-case scenario, an explosion could release 66,260 pounds of sulfur dioxide,…”

“An oil spill may seem tame compared to carcinogenic benzene or mutagenic creosote, but oil in its various forms can cause skin irritation, lung inflammation, and a whole slew of other problems up to, and including, death. At least two ExxonMobil refineries were damaged during the storm,…”

“Dioxin is the chemical responsible for the deaths and deformities stemming from the United States’ application of Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. An extraordinarily small dose — the size of the period on your screen, say — can trigger a fatal reaction in humans.

In the 1960’s, when Houston was home to many paper mills, one major byproduct was dioxin. Much of the mills’ dioxin waste ended up in pits along the San Jacinto River. Now a Superfund site, the San Jacinto pits flood periodically, dosing the groundwater and the seafood-rich Gulf with deadly poison. During Harvey, the site was said to be underwater again. That means floodwaters could carry dioxin-contaminated sediment into parts of the city that have never been contaminated before, putting people at huge risk of exposure“.

http://www.skytruth.org/2017/09/satellite-images-begin-to-show-hurricane-harveys-environmental-impact/

EPA Scott Pruitt permission-to-pollute letter here, https://www.tceq.texas.gov/assets/public/response/hurricanes/hurricane-harvey-fuel-waiver-request.pdf.  WOW

https://seekingalpha.com/news/3292469-storm-damage-exxon-refineries-caused-release-hazardous-pollutants?app=1&uprof=22#email_link  no doubt.

Update  https://newrepublic.com/minutes/144487/unbearable-petrochemical-smells-reportedly-drifting-houston

BREAKING UPDATE flaring in Houston happening now on the heels of #HurricaneHarvey

Headaches experienced on this one by a school…..

 

Thank you Bryan Parras for your above coverage and exposures getting this footage after Hurricane Harvey rolled through the Houston area.

During Hurricane Katrina there were 44 oil spills (that were reported) see link, http://www.nbcnews.com/id/9365607/ns/us_news-katrina_the_long_road_back/t/oil-spills-found-southeast-louisiana/#.WaG9MCiGPIU.

For Hurricane Harvey, after viewing a video of damage in Rockport TX, I snapped a Google Earth pic of a pumpjack and four storage tanks in Rockport  just over 700 feet from a water body that connects to the gulf…..

rockport stporage tanks

So thanks to a friend in the water quality research business, I was given these links when I inquired about my worries on the fossil fuel related potential spills during flooding events….

https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wake.pdf – NRDC report with some statistics on underground tank failures in New Orleans.

https://www.epa.gov/ust/petroleum-brownfields – EPA Brownfields site about underground storage tanks, and EPA’s OUST office, which may be a good contact for more info.

https://www.epa.gov/ust – link to EPA’s UST site, with info on regs and new developments. Might be the best place to start on your inquiry about groundwater.

 https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2014-03/documents/ustfloodguide.pdf- 2010 publication that provides some direction on flood risk and  groundwater contamination, as well as GW contamination systems that some modern USTs may already be equipped with. Probably a pretty informative read.

 ————–

So if worrying about the spills worries you more with historical spill data…don’t worry cause there is nothing you can do about this except push for more renewable energy sources.

About Kim Triolo Feil

Since TX Statute 253.005 forbids drilling in heavily settled municipalities, I unsuccessfully ran for City Council Seat to try to enforce this. Since Urban Drilling, our drinking water has almost tripled for TTHM's. Before moving to Arlington in 1990, I lived in Norco’s “cancer alley”, a refinery town. It was only after Urban Drilling in Arlington did I start having health effects. After our drill site was established closest to my home, the chronic nosebleeds started. I know there are more canaries here in Arlington having reactions to our industrialized airshed (we have 55-60 padsites of gas wells). Come forward and report to me those having health issues especially if you live to the north/northwest of a drill site so I can map your health effects on this blog. My youtube account is KimFeilGood. FAIR USE NOTICE: THIS SITE MAY CONTAIN COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL THE USE OF WHICH HAS NOT ALWAYS BEEN SPECIFICALLY AUTHORIZED BY THE COPYRIGHT OWNER. MATERIAL FROM DIVERSE AND SOMETIMES TEMPORARY SOURCES IS BEING MADE AVAILABLE IN A PERMANENT UNIFIED MANNER, AS PART OF AN EFFORT TO ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH EMINENT DOMAIN AND THE PRIVATIZATION OF PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE (AMONG OTHER THINGS). IT IS BELIEVED THAT THIS IS A 'FAIR USE' OF THE INFORMATION AS ALLOWED UNDER SECTION 107 OF THE US COPYRIGHT LAW. IN ACCORDANCE WITH TITLE 17 USC SECTION 107, THE SITE IS MAINTAINED WITHOUT PROFIT FOR THOSE WHO ACCESS IT FOR RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE: HTTP://WWW.LAW.CORNELL.EDU/ TO USE MATERIAL REPRODUCED ON THIS SITE FOR PURPOSES THAT GO BEYOND 'FAIR USE', PERMISSION IS REQUIRED FROM THE COPYRIGHT OWNER INDICATED WITH A NAME AND INTERNET LINK AT THE END OF EACH ITEM. (NOTE: THE TEXT OF THIS NOTICE WAS ALSO LIFTED FROM CORRIDORNEWS.BLOGSPOT.COM)
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